News

A Book About Resisting Tyranny Turns Into An Incredible Public Art Project

Last month, a slim and timely book ― Timothy Snyder’s On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century ― made The New York Times best-seller list and topped The Washington Post’s. The premise of the book is straightforward: Europe’s failure to recognize and combat tyranny in the past had tragic results that can, at least, provide lessons for the future.

Rather than pontificating on this idea, Snyder bullet-points blunt advice. “Anticipatory obedience is a political tragedy,” he begins in the book’s first chapter, before briskly segueing into historical evidence for his claim. In 1938, he writes, Austrian Nazis stole Jewish property and bystanders either partook or looked on, rather than dissenting. To prevent that from happening again, Snyder outlines actionable guidance.

Taking his message a step further, Snyder’s publisher worked with a crew of artists who adapted it into posters, which appeared as a public art project in East London on Monday.

The book’s entire text is published on a series of posters designed by students at Kingston University ― “as a tool, a provocation and a rallying call,” the publisher said in a statement. They’ll be on view for one week.

“Be kind to our language,” one poster reads in big, playful lettering. “Avoid pronouncing the phrases everyone else does,” it continues. The text suggests instead finding new ways to phrase old ideas, to insure that we pause and reflect rather than merely regurgitating powerful, pathos-appealing rhetoric.

“Learn from peers in other countries,” another poster reads. “… No country is going to find a solution by itself,” it continues.

The posters filter Snyder’s salient advice into palatable sayings, serving as reminders that there’s more to communication than noisy exclamations. Take a look at a few of them below.

Images courtesy of VINTAGE and The Bodley Head.

Tina Fey, Alec Baldwin, Tom Hanks, Tracy Morgan, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Michael Moore, Padma Lakshmi and a whole host of other stars are teaming up for Stand for Rights: A Benefit for the ACLU. Donate now and join us at 7 p.m. ET on Friday, March 31, on Facebook Live. #standforrights2017 

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Dave Chappelle Crashes Chris Rock Show, Says Trump is ‘Gonna Save America by Accident’

Chris Rock’s return to stand-up Saturday night in New Orleans after a nine-year hiatus was crashed by none other than fellow comedian Dave Chappelle.

Dave Chappelle Crashes Chris Rock Show, Says Trump is ‘Gonna Save America by Accident’

Chris Rock’s return to stand-up Saturday night in New Orleans after a nine-year hiatus was crashed by none other than fellow comedian Dave Chappelle.

Russians In Israel Advised Not To Say ‘Schmuck’ Or Get Drunk

AP/Thomas Hartwell
TEL AVIV – Russian tourists visiting Israel have been requested to refrain from using slurs like “schmuck” and from getting drunk, a new directive from the country’s foreign ministry states.

10 Relationship Facts Everyone Should Know Before Getting Married

We hate to be pessimistic, but love alone isn’t enough sustain a marriage. To truly make a marriage last, research suggests you need to be smart and conscientious in how you love your partner.

To that end, we’ve gathered 10 marriage-related facts every engaged couple should know about. Take those rose-colored glasses off and read on.

1.  Sharing the housework = more sex.

Sharing is caring ― and sharing household chores could make for a really hot sex life. A 2015 study from the University of Alberta found that couples who divvy up cleaning tasks reported higher relationship satisfaction and got busy more often than couples who left it to one partner.  

Apparently, when men in the study felt they were making fair contributions to household chores, the couple had more sex and each partner reported more sexual satisfaction. Now we understand why Mr. Clean dances like this:

2. The honeymoon phase may be a myth.

Don’t get too hung up on the hot-and-heavy phase fizzling out: the honeymoon phase may be more of a myth than a reality. According researchers at Deakin University’s Australian Center on Quality of Life, couples are happiest after their first year of marriage. What’s more, newlyweds reported having a lower happiness score than couples who had been married for a long time

Lead researcher Melissa Weinberg attributed the findings to couples having a “wedding hangover” ― a feeling of sadness once the wedding is over and the actual marriage begins.

3. Most couples wait six years before going to marriage counseling ― but you should go sooner.

The average couple who visits a marriage counselor has been struggling for about six years. By that time, some therapists say the damage has already been done. It’s much smarter to go as soon as you start to get serious, when things between you and your S.O. are going relatively smoothly, Ryan Howes, a psychologist in Pasadena, California told HuffPost recently.

“It’s OK to go to counseling when things seem ‘fine’ so that you are more resilient when they aren’t,” he explained. “Even the strongest marriages will encounter tough times eventually, and it’s good to be equipped when they come.”

4. Eye rolls could cost you. Contempt is one of the top predictors of divorce. 

Get a handle on those snarky remarks. According to marriage researcher John Gottman, contemptuous behavior like eye-rolling, sarcasm and name-calling is the number one predictor of divorce.

For forty years, Gottman and his research team at the Gottman Institute have studied couples’ interactions to determine the key predictors of divorce — or as he calls them, “the four horsemen of the apocalypse.” Contempt is the number one sign, followed by criticism, defensiveness and stonewalling (emotionally withdrawing from your partner.) 

5. Cuddling is a game-changer in a long-term relationship.

Big (and little) spoons, rejoice! A 2014 study out of the University of Toronto found that even a small amount of cuddling can produce substantial increases in sexual and relationship satisfaction, especially among women and parents of young children.

6. Arguing over finances early on doesn’t bode well for the marriage.

It may not be the sexiest premarital convo but talking about money issues now rather than later could save you a world of heartache. In 2013 study, researchers at Kansas State University found that early finance-related arguments are the top predictor of divorce. What’s more, this was true across income and wealth levels. That’s your cue to pour a glass of wine and start talking financial histories and money expectations.

7. Men really benefit from getting married. 

Research has suggested that men, in particular, benefit from married life. A major survey of 127,545 American adults found that married men are healthier than men who never tied the knot or whose marriages ended in divorce or widowhood. They also live longer!

8. A few arguments every now and then are actually good for your marriage. 

If something isn’t sitting right with you and your partner, get vocal. In 2012, Florida State University researchers found that bursts of arguments can actually be beneficial to relationships. Arguing helps signal to your partner that certain behaviors ― cough, leaving the dishes in the sink, cough ― are unacceptable, said lead researcher James McNulty

9. Divorce may be contagious. 

We don’t want to ruin your double date plans but the people you surround yourself with matter quite a bit. A study published in the “Social Forces” Journal in 2013 found that divorce can work like a social contagion, spreading among friends and families. If someone in your social network ― say your coworker BFF or family friend ― splits up, the statistical likelihood of ending up in divorce court yourself increases by 75 percent. 

As the researcher explained, “Individuals who get divorced may influence not only their friends, but also their friends’ friends as the propensity to divorce spreads.”

10. Marriage is good for your heart. 

The jury is still out on whether single people or couples are healthier, but research suggests getting hitched is at least heart healthy. 

In one recent study out of New York University’s Lagone Medical Center, researchers found that married men and women had a five percent lower chance of cardiovascular disease compared to single folks.

Why’s that? It may be because married people have better emotional support and deeper social ties to family, which in turn produces lower blood pressure and general heart health. 

type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Stories + articlesList=57db09dde4b08cb1409491ad,579fc7b9e4b0e2e15eb6ea31,57964134e4b01180b52fad5a,58860ae7e4b0d96b98c1de24

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

10 Relationship Facts Everyone Should Know Before Getting Married

We hate to be pessimistic, but love alone isn’t enough sustain a marriage. To truly make a marriage last, research suggests you need to be smart and conscientious in how you love your partner.

To that end, we’ve gathered 10 marriage-related facts every engaged couple should know about. Take those rose-colored glasses off and read on.

1.  Sharing the housework = more sex.

Sharing is caring ― and sharing household chores could make for a really hot sex life. A 2015 study from the University of Alberta found that couples who divvy up cleaning tasks reported higher relationship satisfaction and got busy more often than couples who left it to one partner.  

Apparently, when men in the study felt they were making fair contributions to household chores, the couple had more sex and each partner reported more sexual satisfaction. Now we understand why Mr. Clean dances like this:

2. The honeymoon phase may be a myth.

Don’t get too hung up on the hot-and-heavy phase fizzling out: the honeymoon phase may be more of a myth than a reality. According researchers at Deakin University’s Australian Center on Quality of Life, couples are happiest after their first year of marriage. What’s more, newlyweds reported having a lower happiness score than couples who had been married for a long time

Lead researcher Melissa Weinberg attributed the findings to couples having a “wedding hangover” ― a feeling of sadness once the wedding is over and the actual marriage begins.

3. Most couples wait six years before going to marriage counseling ― but you should go sooner.

The average couple who visits a marriage counselor has been struggling for about six years. By that time, some therapists say the damage has already been done. It’s much smarter to go as soon as you start to get serious, when things between you and your S.O. are going relatively smoothly, Ryan Howes, a psychologist in Pasadena, California told HuffPost recently.

“It’s OK to go to counseling when things seem ‘fine’ so that you are more resilient when they aren’t,” he explained. “Even the strongest marriages will encounter tough times eventually, and it’s good to be equipped when they come.”

4. Eye rolls could cost you. Contempt is one of the top predictors of divorce. 

Get a handle on those snarky remarks. According to marriage researcher John Gottman, contemptuous behavior like eye-rolling, sarcasm and name-calling is the number one predictor of divorce.

For forty years, Gottman and his research team at the Gottman Institute have studied couples’ interactions to determine the key predictors of divorce — or as he calls them, “the four horsemen of the apocalypse.” Contempt is the number one sign, followed by criticism, defensiveness and stonewalling (emotionally withdrawing from your partner.) 

5. Cuddling is a game-changer in a long-term relationship.

Big (and little) spoons, rejoice! A 2014 study out of the University of Toronto found that even a small amount of cuddling can produce substantial increases in sexual and relationship satisfaction, especially among women and parents of young children.

6. Arguing over finances early on doesn’t bode well for the marriage.

It may not be the sexiest premarital convo but talking about money issues now rather than later could save you a world of heartache. In 2013 study, researchers at Kansas State University found that early finance-related arguments are the top predictor of divorce. What’s more, this was true across income and wealth levels. That’s your cue to pour a glass of wine and start talking financial histories and money expectations.

7. Men really benefit from getting married. 

Research has suggested that men, in particular, benefit from married life. A major survey of 127,545 American adults found that married men are healthier than men who never tied the knot or whose marriages ended in divorce or widowhood. They also live longer!

8. A few arguments every now and then are actually good for your marriage. 

If something isn’t sitting right with you and your partner, get vocal. In 2012, Florida State University researchers found that bursts of arguments can actually be beneficial to relationships. Arguing helps signal to your partner that certain behaviors ― cough, leaving the dishes in the sink, cough ― are unacceptable, said lead researcher James McNulty

9. Divorce may be contagious. 

We don’t want to ruin your double date plans but the people you surround yourself with matter quite a bit. A study published in the “Social Forces” Journal in 2013 found that divorce can work like a social contagion, spreading among friends and families. If someone in your social network ― say your coworker BFF or family friend ― splits up, the statistical likelihood of ending up in divorce court yourself increases by 75 percent. 

As the researcher explained, “Individuals who get divorced may influence not only their friends, but also their friends’ friends as the propensity to divorce spreads.”

10. Marriage is good for your heart. 

The jury is still out on whether single people or couples are healthier, but research suggests getting hitched is at least heart healthy. 

In one recent study out of New York University’s Lagone Medical Center, researchers found that married men and women had a five percent lower chance of cardiovascular disease compared to single folks.

Why’s that? It may be because married people have better emotional support and deeper social ties to family, which in turn produces lower blood pressure and general heart health. 

type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Stories + articlesList=57db09dde4b08cb1409491ad,579fc7b9e4b0e2e15eb6ea31,57964134e4b01180b52fad5a,58860ae7e4b0d96b98c1de24

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

WATCH: Iraqi Christians on U.S. President – ‘We Have Confidence in Trump!’

In a new video, a number of Christians living in Iraq expressed their admiration for U.S. President Donald Trump, and their hope that he will make good on promises to assist them and come down hard on the Islamic State.

Darius Rucker Cries For The Love Of The Gamecocks, Who Reach Final Four

We can just hear Darius Rucker singing to his team: “I only wanna be with you.”

Rucker, lead singer of ‘90s hitmakers Hootie and the Blowfish, had himself a moment in New York City’s Madison Square Garden after watching the South Carolina Gamecocks defeat the Florida Gators on Sunday, advancing to their first Final Four in the NCAA Tournament.

Watch the emotional reaction from the former South Carolina student and Charleston native below:

I was sad about the Gators losing until I saw that Darius Rucker was crying tears of joy because South Carolina won. pic.twitter.com/gcK2QJENsL

— Eric Schmidt (@TalkingSchmidt) March 27, 2017

WISTV, a local TV outlet, pointed out that Rucker is so devoted, he hasn’t let work get in his way of March Madness, either. As he performed a concert in Charleston on Friday, the singer stole looks at onstage monitors showing South Carolina upsetting Baylor. 

.@HootieTweets concert in #TDArena but kept @marchmadness is a priority. Got to love it @GamecockMBB @GoHeels Yes those are TVs front stage pic.twitter.com/d7zaiLb94b

— Matt Roberts (@AD_MattRoberts) March 25, 2017

Even Julia Louis-Dreyfus and Bill Murray ― other celebrity fans whose teams eventually bowed out ― didn’t show that level of fanaticism.

Great stuff here from an emotional Darius Rucker at centercourt, Madison Square Garden after USC punches Final 4 ticket- @ABCNews4 pic.twitter.com/gnZ1eE6e9V

— Scott Eisberg (@SEisbergWCIV) March 26, 2017

H/T For The Win

Tina Fey, Alec Baldwin, Tom Hanks, Tracy Morgan, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Michael Moore, Padma Lakshmi and a whole host of other stars are teaming up for Stand for Rights: A Benefit for the ACLU. Donate now and join us at 7 p.m. ET on Friday, March 31, on Facebook Live. #standforrights2017 

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

How A Grandma’s Modest Closet Found Its Way Into The Metropolitan Museum Of Art

Sara Berman kept her closet in perfect order ― shoes lined up in an unerring row, crisply ironed white shirts stacked one atop the other, her signature bottle of Chanel 19 perched within easy grasp. Her children and grandchildren would gaze into the modest, meticulously organized niche reverently, as if staring at a work of art.

Still, they never actually imagined their mom or grandma’s closet would one day, quite literally, find its way into The Metropolitan Museum of Art. 

“If someone told my mother her closet would be in the Met one day, she would have thought they were crazy,” artist, author and illustrator Maira Kalman said during a talk held at the museum last week, alongside her son, Alex Kalman, and Amelia Peck, a curator of American decorative arts at the Met. And yet, among the period rooms in the museum’s American Wing, most of which display opulent domestic craftsmanship from the 17th to 19th centuries, is Berman’s neat and tidy closet of the ‘80s, a dressing quarters Marie Kondo would surely approve of. 

Berman was born in Belarus in 1920, when pogroms and poverty were daunting realities. At 12 years old, she moved with her family to Tel Aviv, in what was then Palestine, where they lived in a paltry beach shack by the Mediterranean Sea, which Berman was constantly sweeping free of sand. Still, Berman dressed in style; her mother would sew her outfits copied from European fashion magazines. She was especially fond of the color white, a common choice for those wishing to mollify the rancor of the beating sun.

In 1954, Berman moved again, this time to New York with her husband and two daughters, Maira and Kika, putting down roots in a Bronx apartment. Fifteen years later, at 60 years old, Berman uprooted her life once more, divorcing her husband after 38 years and moving into a Greenwich Village studio on her own. She left many of her belongings behind. 

It was in the Greenwich apartment that Berman’s knack for organization reached its peak. Berman had started a new life chapter ― a rarity for a 60-year-old woman, especially in the 1960s ― and had few objects to her name. What things she did have were painstakingly cleaned, ironed and folded, each methodically positioned in its proper place. Following her divorce, Berman began exclusively wearing the color white. Her children never asked why, but Kalman imagines it has something to do with the flowing white linens that swayed from the laundry clotheslines back in Tel Aviv. 

In 1982, Berman passed away at 84 years old. In her wake, her closet was imbued with additional power, the orderly white garments humbly offering guidance for how to live. “How do you construct your life?” Kalman elaborated. “How do you sort out what is important and what isn’t? How do you create order? Find beauty? Make meaning?” Among the towers of T-shirts and folded men’s pants, Berman tendered her approach. 

When curator Peck first saw Sara Berman’s closet it was at Mmuseum, Berman’s grandson Alex Kalman’s teeny tiny museum nook located off Canal Street in lower Manhattan. The space, Kalman explained, is designed to exhibit “vernacular objects, no masterpieces.” Peck came to visit one day, and it was over a long cup of coffee that followed when Peck had the wild idea to frame Berman’s closet as a period room. “I’m a big believer in period rooms’ ability to bring people into other times, other lives,” Peck said, be they the lives of an 18th century aristocrat or a 20th century divorcée. 

Sara Berman’s closet now lives alongside rooms from a very different crowd, namely extravagant homes from the 17th to 19th centuries. The space is next to the dressing room of Arabella Worsham who, after marrying railroad magnate Collis Huntington in 1882, became the richest woman in America. Like Berman, Worsham underwent a mid-life reinvention of sorts, transforming from a Southerner of meager means to one of New York’s high society elite. Her dressing room is nothing less than palatial, from its ornate wooden armoire to the gown hanging inside. 

Side by side, Berman and Worsham make lovely foils for one another. While Berman is all order and minimalism and so much white, Worsham is luxury, abundance and warm wood. The rooms offer two diverging portraits of women, living one century apart in time and perhaps worlds apart in spirit, though both seeming to share an aesthetic sensibility and a feeling of pride and care for their possessions. The rooms also represent rare spaces where women of the past could possess full agency over their domains ― what they wore and how and why. For women who, like Berman and Worsham, were financially dependent on men and never had jobs of their own, dressing offered an opportunity for power and independence.

As Peck half-joked, “I like to call this our feminist wing. We finally got one!” 

There is much to unpack inside Sara Berman’s closet aside from underwear and sweaters. In part, the space is an immigrant story, of how one woman’s journey from Belarus to Palestine to New York City is represented through cheese graters, sunglasses and watches (the latter of which Berman always wore three ― one for New York time, one for Los Angeles, and one for Tel Aviv.) In part, it’s a meditation on loss and how inanimate objects can come to possess the spirit of a human being, especially after her physical body is no longer. It’s also an ode to feminine independence, self-discovery and re-invention ― or as Kalman put it, that “nothing in life has an expiration date. You are free to change at any age.” It’s a story of love and family and art and how extraordinary regular people and their things truly are, if you take the time to look. Finally, it’s great inspiration to clean out your closet. Or, create a masterpiece worthy of The Met, however you want to put it. 

Sara Berman’s Closet” is on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art until September 5, 2017. 

Tina Fey, Alec Baldwin, Tom Hanks, Tracy Morgan, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Michael Moore, Padma Lakshmi and a whole host of other stars are teaming up for Stand for Rights: A Benefit for the ACLU. Donate now and join us at 7 p.m. ET on Friday, March 31, on Facebook Live. #standforrights2017 

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

How A Grandma’s Modest Closet Found Its Way Into The Metropolitan Museum Of Art

Sara Berman kept her closet in perfect order ― shoes lined up in an unerring row, crisply ironed white shirts stacked one atop the other, her signature bottle of Chanel 19 perched within easy grasp. Her children and grandchildren would gaze into the modest, meticulously organized niche reverently, as if staring at a work of art.

Still, they never actually imagined their mom or grandma’s closet would one day, quite literally, find its way into The Metropolitan Museum of Art. 

“If someone told my mother her closet would be in the Met one day, she would have thought they were crazy,” artist, author and illustrator Maira Kalman said during a talk held at the museum last week, alongside her son, Alex Kalman, and Amelia Peck, a curator of American decorative arts at the Met. And yet, among the period rooms in the museum’s American Wing, most of which display opulent domestic craftsmanship from the 17th to 19th centuries, is Berman’s neat and tidy closet of the ‘80s, a dressing quarters Marie Kondo would surely approve of. 

Berman was born in Belarus in 1920, when pogroms and poverty were daunting realities. At 12 years old, she moved with her family to Tel Aviv, in what was then Palestine, where they lived in a paltry beach shack by the Mediterranean Sea, which Berman was constantly sweeping free of sand. Still, Berman dressed in style; her mother would sew her outfits copied from European fashion magazines. She was especially fond of the color white, a common choice for those wishing to mollify the rancor of the beating sun.

In 1954, Berman moved again, this time to New York with her husband and two daughters, Maira and Kika, putting down roots in a Bronx apartment. Fifteen years later, at 60 years old, Berman uprooted her life once more, divorcing her husband after 38 years and moving into a Greenwich Village studio on her own. She left many of her belongings behind. 

It was in the Greenwich apartment that Berman’s knack for organization reached its peak. Berman had started a new life chapter ― a rarity for a 60-year-old woman, especially in the 1960s ― and had few objects to her name. What things she did have were painstakingly cleaned, ironed and folded, each methodically positioned in its proper place. Following her divorce, Berman began exclusively wearing the color white. Her children never asked why, but Kalman imagines it has something to do with the flowing white linens that swayed from the laundry clotheslines back in Tel Aviv. 

In 1982, Berman passed away at 84 years old. In her wake, her closet was imbued with additional power, the orderly white garments humbly offering guidance for how to live. “How do you construct your life?” Kalman elaborated. “How do you sort out what is important and what isn’t? How do you create order? Find beauty? Make meaning?” Among the towers of T-shirts and folded men’s pants, Berman tendered her approach. 

When curator Peck first saw Sara Berman’s closet it was at Mmuseum, Berman’s grandson Alex Kalman’s teeny tiny museum nook located off Canal Street in lower Manhattan. The space, Kalman explained, is designed to exhibit “vernacular objects, no masterpieces.” Peck came to visit one day, and it was over a long cup of coffee that followed when Peck had the wild idea to frame Berman’s closet as a period room. “I’m a big believer in period rooms’ ability to bring people into other times, other lives,” Peck said, be they the lives of an 18th century aristocrat or a 20th century divorcée. 

Sara Berman’s closet now lives alongside rooms from a very different crowd, namely extravagant homes from the 17th to 19th centuries. The space is next to the dressing room of Arabella Worsham who, after marrying railroad magnate Collis Huntington in 1882, became the richest woman in America. Like Berman, Worsham underwent a mid-life reinvention of sorts, transforming from a Southerner of meager means to one of New York’s high society elite. Her dressing room is nothing less than palatial, from its ornate wooden armoire to the gown hanging inside. 

Side by side, Berman and Worsham make lovely foils for one another. While Berman is all order and minimalism and so much white, Worsham is luxury, abundance and warm wood. The rooms offer two diverging portraits of women, living one century apart in time and perhaps worlds apart in spirit, though both seeming to share an aesthetic sensibility and a feeling of pride and care for their possessions. The rooms also represent rare spaces where women of the past could possess full agency over their domains ― what they wore and how and why. For women who, like Berman and Worsham, were financially dependent on men and never had jobs of their own, dressing offered an opportunity for power and independence.

As Peck half-joked, “I like to call this our feminist wing. We finally got one!” 

There is much to unpack inside Sara Berman’s closet aside from underwear and sweaters. In part, the space is an immigrant story, of how one woman’s journey from Belarus to Palestine to New York City is represented through cheese graters, sunglasses and watches (the latter of which Berman always wore three ― one for New York time, one for Los Angeles, and one for Tel Aviv.) In part, it’s a meditation on loss and how inanimate objects can come to possess the spirit of a human being, especially after her physical body is no longer. It’s also an ode to feminine independence, self-discovery and re-invention ― or as Kalman put it, that “nothing in life has an expiration date. You are free to change at any age.” It’s a story of love and family and art and how extraordinary regular people and their things truly are, if you take the time to look. Finally, it’s great inspiration to clean out your closet. Or, create a masterpiece worthy of The Met, however you want to put it. 

Sara Berman’s Closet” is on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art until September 5, 2017. 

Tina Fey, Alec Baldwin, Tom Hanks, Tracy Morgan, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Michael Moore, Padma Lakshmi and a whole host of other stars are teaming up for Stand for Rights: A Benefit for the ACLU. Donate now and join us at 7 p.m. ET on Friday, March 31, on Facebook Live. #standforrights2017 

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.